Kaslo Sourdough Pasta: Is Fermentation the Answer to Healthy Gluten-Grains?

While many gluten-free pasta options are now widely available – be it brown rice, quinoa, corn, or buckwheat – something is largely absent from these alternatives. Texture, taste – these alternatives, while healthy themselves, lack something comforting about the texture and taste of traditional pasta. 

Sometimes you just want to have a regular bowl of pasta with durum wheat noodles without suffering the consequences of eating gluten. 

After all, gluten-free pasta tends to be significantly starchier (and stick together much more) than traditional pasta. It also retains less of that specific chewy texture that comes from durum wheat. 

Kaslo Sourdough’s pasta line seeks to provide an alternative that is both healthy, and provides the original texture, consistency, and flavor of traditional pasta. All the while, still ensuring the process used to create this food removes many of the harmful effects of ‘gluten’ and gluten associated proteins found abundantly in wheat. 

According to Kaslo’s Pasta, the crux of this issue lies at the heart of how pasta and commercial wheat products (like bread) are now made, compared to traditional methods. They point to other European countries and a long history of using wheat and bread that have sustained growth and development in human society for ages. Yet, this was all done without the same digestive and autoimmune issues we have plaguing us now as a result of ingesting wheat-related products, such as pasta and bread. 

A lot of this, sadly, has to do with industrialization and creating food on a mass scale – this has reduced the natural time involved, fermentation processes, and bacterial cultures (through fermentation). These are essential components required to make the nutrients in wheat more bioavailable, as well as more digestible and less problematic. 

This ancient process is that which is still used today when creating Kaslo’s Sourdough Pasta. 

There is one exception, they state, and this has to do with people who are severely intolerant to gluten, such as those with a pre-existing autoimmune condition triggered by gluten or gluten-containing grains, or those with celiac disease. For these individuals, a strict diet and avoidance of gluten containing products needs to be followed for optimal health.

However, those who have mild intolerances, or some difficulty digesting gluten (especially durum wheat pasta, which is particularly high in protein and gluten) may benefit from trying Kaslo’s Sourdough Pasta which is naturally and slowly fermented. Upset stomach and indigestion no more!

Many of these individuals may find they don’t react to or digest breads such as rye and sourdough the same way they do a commercial brand of white bread. This all has to do with the fermentation process and the bacterial cultures used in the production of these breads. As well, it also has to do with how mass produced, commercially available bread and wheat products are manufactured. 

Certain foods – particularly grains and legumes, require preparation before consuming them. 

A lot of this stems from the Industrial Revolution, and the rapid increase in mass production of food, along with the invention of baking yeast. This helped to ensure a uniform product and eliminated the need for bacterial culture and fermentation (things which are both hard to keep viable and slow down mass production). 

This unfortunately eliminated the important role of fermentation – helping to aid in the digestive process of gluten, along with increasing natural enzymes that can help break down the often difficult to digest proteins founds in wheat (not exclusive to gluten). 

It makes sense then that there is a correlation between the low prevalence of celiac disease (and gluten intolerance) in Eastern European countries that consume primarily ryes and sourdough breads, compared to North American countries. These are countries that consume a high amount of refined wheat products that have not undergone fermentation or used a natural bacterial process.  

While the fermentation process used to produce this pasta (and traditional sourdough bread) does not completely eliminate gluten or other proteins found in wheat, it can increase digestibility and studies are now contesting if it really is specifically the ‘gluten’ protein that is causing digestive issues for people who don’t have celiac disease or an autoimmune condition triggered by gluten or dairy. Rather, it seems to be a variety of the compounds in wheat and gluten containing grains that are not broken down or readily digestible from the fermentation process.

Stripped of natural enzymes and pre-digestive bacteria, grains become much more difficult on the stomach. 

This creates inflammation, especially chronic inflammation if these products are being consumed on a regular basis. This naturally leads to issues with the gut and digestive disturbances. Gut issues and dysbiosis can further trigger autoimmune responses, as can an overactive immune system. 

When they are refined – like pasta’s durum flour and white bread, they are also stripped of all nutrients and antioxidants. The only present nutrients are those artificially added back in or “fortified” with. 

Most of these products are extremely dense in protein content and gluten, but provide none of the beneficial compounds, enzymes, bacteria, or antioxidants that can help the body process them. This is the problem with most ‘gluten’ containing products on today’s market. 

We all know fermented foods like kombucha, sauerkraut, kimchi, and natto are extremely beneficial because of the fermentation process from a live bacterial culture, yet many don’t factor this consideration in when purchasing bread, pasta or grains. Yet, all of these are even more difficult to digest or absorb nutrients from than vegetables, tea, or tofu. 

Kaslo has integrated this method of fermentation from a natural sourdough culture to produce a range of pasta that is more easily digestible, nutritious, and better for you than traditional durum wheat pasta found in grocery stores. This family tradition and business has had its roots in the sourdough bread making process for decades, and has now sought to bring these methods to consumers looking for better choices when it comes to making pasta. Completely family owned and operated, this is a brand of pasta you can feel good about eating, and that should make you feel good too! 

For those that have had mild digestive issues with gluten, or mild intolerances – or even those who have just flat out avoided gluten because of all the concerns associated with wheat…Kaslo provides a healthy, nutritious, fermented option that should ease the stomach. Their products are now widely available in a variety of options like hemp, quinoa, and buckwheat and millet, ensuring there are options for every taste preference and every possible pasta dish!