mylk-courgette-porridge

Review: Rebel Kitchen Mylks

I don’t know about everywhere else in in the world, but it seems London is going a bit health crazy at the moment. On the weekend I found myself at the trendy Good Life Eatery with a Matcha unsweetened almond milk latte! It was delightfully un-sweet and a far cry from the Starbucks Chai Tea Lattes I used to be a bit obsessed with…
matcha-greentea-latte

With everyone all of a sudden looking for sugar-free, gluten-free, dairy-free and the rest of it, there are of course a number products entering the picture.

Recently I was kindly offered to be sent some Rebel Kitchen Mylks and thought I would do a bit of a review/write up on these as they seem to be the ‘in vogue’ product of the moment.

rebel-kitchen-alldrinks
Now before saying ‘yes’ to getting sent this pretty little parcel, I was actually aware of their ingredients because I’d already checked them out a while back. I knew they were relatively high in natural sugars of the date variety (my former fructose obsession), but because I now can have some natural sugar in my diet without fantising daily about carrot cake (i.e. I have control), I was curious to see what all the ‘Mylk’ fuss was about.
mylk-ingredients

Dairy-free but not sugar-free

I think the most important thing to point out with these drinks is that although refined sugar-free, these ‘Mylks’ are still relatively high in natural sugars and it’s important to be aware of that. Most of them have 7.4g per 100ml and with a larger carton containing 330ml, that’s just over 24g per one.
mylk-nutritional-info

Now although that is quite high for a drink, some of that sugar is likely coming from coconut milk and actually they don’t taste overly sickly sweet which means they are probably not as high in fructose as you might think (I have a highly sensitised sweet palette to determine this). It is quite hard to work out exactly how much fructose are in these so I’m afraid my tastebuds are the best test I can offer right now.

I also have to admit, they’re rather delicious. Dangerously delicious even – you could easily knock back that 24g bottle in one swoop, but you can also make the handy screw-top cartons stretch for 2-3 portions which helps. All of the flavours are slightly different, but they all have this satisfying earthy flavour and are super refreshing when served very cold. If you miss certain flavours like artificial banana or chocolate orange, you can get your natural sweet milk fix here for sure. Whilst quite high in sugar, they’re a much better option than those Weetabix drinks I’ve seen advertised on every other billboard around London!

What I think is good is that they are a drink option that’s not water and that is naturally sweet rather than refined sweet. Apart from some coconut water brands, there really aren’t much other low or natural sugar options on the drinks front so I appreciate the choice they give people.

How to use

Because of the sugar content, I wouldn’t recommend grabbing these as a regular ‘healthy’ drink because, like dates did for me a while back, the date syrup in these might make you fancy sweet a little bit more than you’d like, thus not moving you towards that place of control. Of course, for those who are dairy-free who want chocolate milk in their life, they’re a godsend, but if you’re not dairy-free, then the fact they’re dairy-free isn’t really doing much for you in terms of health benefit, if you get what I mean?

If you’re trying to keep control on your sugar cravings, try by all means, but treat them as a treat like other sweet things. I made these last a few weeks and picked my moments carefully. They served as something nice to have when I was slightly hungover after my birthday night – a whole lot healthier than a very sugary juice or fizzy drink which I know many people resort to on a hangover. I also took one of the smaller ones (200ml) in my bag as a post workout refuel and on other days I just decided I would indulge a little. I was just mindful when doing so.

I do also think you can also use them cleverly to naturally sweeten things. I used half a carton (165ml, 12g sugar) to add natural sweetness to some courgette porridge and it was delicious. I also used half a carton one day to sweeten a green smoothie instead of fruit.

Again, this is your call depending on how much control you feel over your cravings but I hope this review was helpful. They are delicious and are much healthier than other drinks, but just be aware of the total natural sugar content per carton.

Have you tried the Rebel Kitchen Mylks? What did you think? Would love to hear your thoughts and if you feel you can have them in a craving controlled lower sugar diet?

IMG_5135

Review: Lizi’s Low Sugar Granola (video)

Before you watch the video I just want to say I kept saying Lindsey instead of Lizi (Very sorry Lizi’s Granola for this!). I always manage to do something when it comes to video blogging (one time I created my own word ‘diabesity’ without realising!)

You can buy Lizi’s Low Sugar from their website here for £3.75 a bag. I’ve also seen it’s now stocked in As Nature Intended stores.

Also watch my video on Goji berries here

IMG_5135

IMG_5130

using chia seeds to steady blood sugar levels

Using chia seeds to steady blood sugar

Blood sugar like this…er no thanks!

Getting yourself good with sugar is really quite simple if you think of it as roller coaster. Save the adrenaline for the real thing at the theme park and turn your own blood sugar big dipper into a tame, flat, steady ride, that is so boring you completely forget you’re even on it. Haunted house anyone?

Anything that helps stop a sudden surge of carbohydrate or sugar into your system will facilitate this steady flow of blood sugar and potentially stop sugar cravings or a sudden carbohydrate need later on.

Enter the use of chia seeds.

This is a close up picture, they really are the size of poppy seeds

These tiny black specs that somewhat resemble poppy seeds come from a South American plant related to the mint family. When added to water they form a kind of gel, which in the stomach slows everything down, including sugar absorption from carbohydrates. The fibre in chia seeds also means everything ticks along through the system nicely if you know what I mean.

What’s more, chia seeds are ridiculously nutrient dense.  They have:

 

  • 8 x more Omega-3 essential fatty acids than salmon
  • 7 x more Vitamin C than oranges
  • 6 x more fibre than oat bran
  • 5 x more calcium than milk
  • 4 x higher antioxidants than blueberries
  • 3 x more iron than spinach
  • 2 x more potassium than bananas
  • 15 x more magnesium than broccoli
  • 18 amino acids
  • Vitamin A and B12
  • Complete protein (23%)

Using Chia Seeds

So what on earth should you do with them? (I did also wonder this when I came home with a packet full of good intentions). You can…

  1. Add a teaspoon in the morning to your breakfast cereal, yoghurt, porridge or anything really.
  2. Sprinkle on salads, soups, cheese on toast….you name it.
  3. Use in baking (but you will need to add some water to compensate). You can even use them

This weekend I tried an adapted version of a quick easy chia seed pudding. Check out how they turned out here.

Chia seeds are somewhat on the pricy side but they last well and are an investment in your health. No they don’t taste of anything and they’re so small they barely add texture, but just rest assured you’re enhancing your diet by eating them.

Have you heard of chia seeds before? Any good tips or recipes to share?